Top 5 Best Beer Spots in Louisville

  1. The Irish Rover – The Rover normally keeps 11 beers on tap, with 8-9 being excellent. They also have a great bottle selection that regulars like I know about.

 

  1. Holy Grail – While not a friendly bunch (they all think they are beer experts), the bar has a great selection of beer.

 

  1. Bluegrass Brewing Company – All the beer is locally made and fresh. They change beers throughout the year while always keeping the best such as their Bourbon Barrel.

 

  1. Flanagan’s Alehouse – Excellent selection of draft and a never ending selection of bottled beers.

 

  1. Sergio’s World Beers – At least 1100 different beers in-stock at any given time. What more needs to be said?

Top 5 Bars to grab a Whiskey (Bourbon, American Whiskey, Scotch or Irish Whiskey)

  1. Brown Hotel – They always keep a bottle of Pappy Van Winkle in stock. Made me a believer!

 

  1. Galt House – Over priced, but a beautiful bar with a nice selection.

 

  1. The Bristol – They cater to the “tourist” crowd and keep a nice selection of the “good stuff”.

 

  1. Bourbon Bristol – Probably the best selection of Bourbon in town, hence the name. I rate them second because a bartender admitted they jack the prices because “people are willing to pay it.”

 

  1. The Irish Rover – While I love Bourbon, being a Kentucky Native myself, I enjoy Irish Whiskey and Scotch more. Nobody locally has a better Irish Whiskey selection and very few can rival Mr. Reidy’s Scotch selection.

Top 5 Best Sports Bars in Louisville

  1. Hooters in St. Matthews – Overrated food and drink prices. Then, again, who cares when you are surrounded by hot girls dressed like sluts?

 

  1. Krazy Dave’s – Nobody in Louisville would agree. I picked it because there’s always room; enough TV’s and most bar goers will watch sports elsewhere.

 

  1. Roosters in Middletown – Cheaper than B-Dubbs with tons of TV’s and specials throughout the week.

 

  1. The Brickhouse – Hot girls and unlike Hooters, good food and tons of great imported beers.

 

  1. Buffalo Wild Wings of St. Matthews – Great bar staff and the best managers in Louisville. To this day, best wings in town!

Top 5 Best Sandwiches in Louisville

  1. Jason Deli’s Chipotle Pot Roast – A giant portion of savory pot roast covered with a delicious chipotle sauce. One word – awesome.

 

  1. Tony Bombozz’s the Veggie – I am no vegetarian, however, I would be if all vegetarian food tasted this good.

 

  1. The Irish Rover’s Lamb Burger – Decent price and not overly gamer due to the mix of beef. Best medium rare with blue cheese.

 

  1. The Brickhouse’s Lamb Burger – A little pricey but excellent. 100% Lamb meat with no beef. The goat cheese is awesome.

 

  1. Diorio’s Philly Cheese Steak – Finally, a Louisville restaurant that can actually serve one correctly! None locally even come close to this one.

Top 5 Best Ham/CheeseBurgers in Louisville

Note – I have tried all these places and burgers!

5. Dizzy Whizz – Old school and nothing fancy. Simple, yet delicious.

4. Tumbleweed’s En Fuego Burger – Tons of hot pepper with Frank’s Hot Sauce. Also weighs a whopping half-pound.

3. Backdoor’s Back-burner Burger – Been years since I’ve had one. One thing I recall — great grill flavor and always filling.

2. Bluegrass Brewing Company’s Germantown Burger – Take a 1/3 burger and add beer cheese. That equals yummy.

1. Highlands Taproom’s Kentucky Bluegrass Burger – The plain cheese burgers here are excellent. How to make them better? Had a bourbon glaze and top it with blue cheese. Hands down, the best burger in Louisville.

Horror Movies based on real life

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/23/horror-films-inspired-by-real-life_n_4150442.html

Released in 2013, “The Conjuring,” starring Patrick Wilson and Vera Farmiga, is about two paranormal investigators — Ed Warren and his wife, Lorraine – and their investigation of a family that was supposedly terrorized by a dark presence when they moved into a Rhode Island farmhouse in the 1970s. The film was promoted heavily as being “based on a true story” prior to its release. Since the film’s release, some viewers have called into question the veracity of the accounts that were detailed on the silver screen. Ed Warren died in 2006 and his 86-year-old wife was unavailable for comment, but HuffPost did find someone familiar with the pair. Tony Spera, director of the New England Society for Psychic Research – an organization founded by the Warrens in 1952 – said the film is about as real as it gets. “The movie is very close to the actual events that traumatized the family,” Spera said. “Banging sounds, rapping noises, ghostly images and the presence of the witch were [all] occurrences that actually transpired in that house.” Spera also said the depictions of the Warrens were “spot on” and commented that Farmiga’s performance left him “slack jawed.”
  • 2
    The Exorcism Of Emily Rose
    Famed film critic Roger Ebert called “The Exorcism of Emily Rose” an “intriguing and perplexing movie.” The 2005 film follows the trial of Father Richard Moore, a priest played by actor Tom Wilkinson, who is charged with negligent homicide in the death of Emily Rose. The young girl supposedly died as a result of a failed exorcism. According to Brian Dunning, a writer who hosts the weekly podcast, Skeptoid, there is some real world DNA inside the cinematic feature. “[The] story is based on the 1976 case of the German girl Anneliese Michel, who died of dehydration and starvation after months of intensive exorcism activity by two Catholic priests … Anneliese had been undergoing psychiatric treatment for many years, and today we believe she suffered from both schizophrenia and dissociative identity disorder,” Dunning told HuffPost. Dunning said Michel’s parents and the two priests were ultimately found guilty of manslaughter, and the case inspired some members of the Catholic Church to reform parts of the exorcism ritual. However, those reforms were largely ignored. “Psychiatrists today agree that exorcism does far more psychological harm than good,” Dunning said.
  • 3
    Eaten Alive
    Directed by Tobe Hooper, a popular screenwriter and producer, the 1977 horror film “Eaten Alive,” follows the story of a Texas hotel owner who has a penchant for murder and feeds his victims to a large pet crocodile. The film is said to be inspired by Joe Ball, a bootlegger and alleged serial killer, who operated the Sociable Inn in Elmendorf, Texas, in the early 1900s. The DVD release also includes a mini documentary about Ball. Truth be told, the only similarity between Ball and his supposed movie counterpart “Judd” is that both men have an apparent affection for crocodilians. Ball, who kept a pond full of alligators next to his inn, committed suicide in 1938, after police questioned him about the disappearance of his wife and former girlfriend. A handyman who worked for Ball allegedly admitted to helping his boss dispose of the bodies of the two missing women and led police to their remains. It was known that Ball often fed animals to his gators, so police officers searched the pond but found no human remains. Despite the lack of evidence, rumors persisted that Ball had killed as many as 30 women and fed their bodies to his alligators.
  • 4
    The Mothman Prophecies
    Released to theatres in 2002, “The Mothman Prophecies” follows John Klein, played by Richard Gere, as he leaves his Washington newspaper job to investigate sightings of winged creatures, referred to as “mothmen,” in a small West Virginia town. The film claims to be based on actual events that occurred in Point Pleasant, W.Va., between November 1966 and December 1967.Loren Coleman, founder and director of the International Cryptozoology Museum in Portland, Maine, was a consultant during the production of “The Mothman Prophecies.” According to Coleman, the film, which is based on the 1975 book of the same name by parapsychologist John Keel, is a fictionalized narrative of actual events. “‘The Mothman Prophecies’ is based in reality, but the film is [director] Mark Pellington’s docudrama/fictionalized narrative motion picture of the events,” Coleman told HuffPost. “The characters … were created from parts of the personality and experiences of … Keel. Even the character names are formed via movie scriptwriters as puns, for example [Alexander] Leek [is] Keel backwards.”

Real Life Zombie outbreak??

http://offgridsurvival.com/zombieapocalypsereal/

 

This isn’t a science fiction movie; It’s reality.

Our society has degraded so far down into the gutter that today’s youth will do anything to escape from reality, including taking drugs that are literally turning them into walking zombies. It’s really a sad state of affairs, but it should serve as a wake up call to those who are still in denial as to where our society is heading – The Zombie Apocalypse.

I know that’s ridiculous right? Wrong!

Real ZombiesNow I’m not talking about the Walking Dead here. I’m talking about real-life zombies who are so whacked out on drugs, television, our sick society, and countless other degenerating factors, that they have morphed into mindless soulless beasts that no longer care about their fellow human beings.

Think I’m exaggerating? Have you taken a good look at society lately? People are willing to literally kill each other over an iPhone. Forget the mindless idiots who sit in line for ten hours when the stupid phone hits the market – because heaven for bid they be caught walking around with a phone that’s more than 6 months old – no people are actually killing each other over iPhones.

But it’s not just iPhones; it’s our whole sick society. We have a culture that’s become obsessed with anything immoral and everything violent.

If you think the Zombie Apocalypse is just science fiction, take a look at what’s happening on the streets of Chicago. In my opinion, Chicago is a thousand times worse than a Zombie movie, and it could be a good look at what our future has instore for us all.

Last year alone, over 500 people where mercilessly gunned down in the streets of Chicago. Many of these people were killed simply for walking over some imaginary line in Chicago’s notorious gang filled neighborhoods.

While some would like to pass these incidents of as anomalies, or something that only affects urban areas, the problem is much more than an inner city problem.

This culture of violence has invaded every aspect of our lives. These aren’t poor urban kids in some neighborhood that you’ll never have to walk through, these are people of every race, and from every corner of America. Watch the first five minutes of your local news tonight and then tell me I’m wrong.

The Zombie Apocalypse is Here, and it’s only going to get Worse.

In my opinion, our society is just one disaster away from total collapse. Take a look at disasters like Hurricane Sandy or Katrina, and then imagine what would happen if our country were to face a similar, but prolonged nationwide disaster.

It’s not the Walking Dead who you’re going to have to worry about.

  • It’s the over half of all American who rely on prescription drugs to function that will be going through massive withdrawals once they can’t obtain their medications.
  • It’s your neighbors who will be killing each other for food and water.
  • It’s the over 50% of American who depend on Government assistance to live.
  • It’s the unprepared masses who are so reliant on modern technology who admit they wouldn’t last over 2 weeks without electricity.
  • It’s the average American Citizen who has forgotten the skills they need to survive without running to the local Walmart.

Did you know the average American spends more than 40 hours a week watching T.V.? That’s more time than someone spends working at a full-time job! According to a study commissioned by Nokia, the average cell phone user checks their phone at least 150 times a day, or approximately once every 6 minutes.

But it’s even worse when you take a look at the next generation, who spends more than 71/2 hours a day consuming digital media. Is it any wonder why society is devolving into a bunch of zombies? We have a world full of people who have literally checked out of reality.